Save the last orangutan refuge

Two young orangutans in the rainforest on Sumatra, IndonesiaThe Sumatra orangutans are in great danger (Photo: Jay Ullal)

Flames, as far as the eye can see. More than 100 fires have blazed across Tripa within a week. The forest, one of the last refuges for the endangered Sumatran orangutans, is at great risk. If the accountable palm oil corporation is not stopped, they could disappear completely by the end of 2012. Please help the orangutans.

Flames, as far as the eye can see. More than 100 fires have blazed across Tripa within a week. This forest, which is one of the last refuges for the endangered Sumatran orangutans, is at great risk. If the accountable oil palm corporation is not stopped, these great apes could disappear completely by the end of 2012. They need our help urgently. 

The Tripa forest is home to many rare species, including the densest population of the last remaining 6,600 Sumatran orangutans that enjoy feeding on the lucious vegetation here. But Indonesia is about to sound the death knell for the Tripa forest.  

This court decision is literally about life and death

Tripa

Three quarters of this conservation area have already given way to oil palm plantations. And the destruction is moving along. One of the main actors is oil palm corporation PT Kallista Alam, who is cutting down and burning the precious forest as you read these lines. Kallista even received an official permission – despite a two year moratorium on forest clearance. 

Indonesia's environmental NGO Walhi, along with local people, have filed a lawsuit against these cut-and-burn activities. The court hearing is currently taking place.

Update: The case is set to move to High Court.

This case could set a precedent. Reconfirmation of the oil palm corporation could resemble a death sentence for the remaining forest. 

More information: Carbon sink Tripa swamp 

Please help to save Tripa and the Sumatran orangutans.

Carbon sink Tripa swamp

Tripa is one of the last peat swamp forests on the west coast of Aceh in Sumatra. Demolishing this swamp results in the release of vast amounts of carbon dioxide. This violates the international agreement signed by Indonesia. Due to the rampant destruction of its forests, Indonesia currently ranges among the worst climate offenders.

Enormous release of greenhouse gas

For agricultural use, oil palm corporations drain the soil and let the turf dry out. Earth-bound carbon oxidizes and turns into carbon dioxide. This becomes part of the atmosphere and contributes to the heating up of the planet. Logging and draining effectively produce up to 25 percent of all global greenhouse gases.

Overall, the release of 120 million tons of CO2 could be prevented if no new plantations were built in Tripa for the next 30 years.

The forgotten moratorium

Indonesia's President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono has issued a moratorium on logging for the entire state. This was part of a one billion dollar deal with Norway in order to reduce the emission of greenhouse gas. The local authorization for the current deforestation that oil palm corporation Kallista Alam received, was granted by Governor Irwardi Yusuf. The same man who had formerly pronounced a moratorium on logging for the whole of Aceh. A variety of sources have reported that the oil palm company exerted great pressure on the decision makers in Aceh and Jakarta.

Animals and people are suffering

The peat swamp forests are home to elefants, tigers, rhinos and of course orangutans. Furthermore they provide drinking water and fish as well as plants for food and medicine for the local people. Increasingly occuring floods and droughts, as a result of a disrupted ecosystem, pose a great challenge to the locals. The next tsunami could turn out a deadly threat for thousands as the natural protective barrier has disappeared. Here is a short documentary voicing the worries of the people concerned:

Further information and links

Many thanks to Peter Jaeggi for providing us with vital information.

Aerial photograph of a burning rainforestMore than 100 fires were set to the swamp forest of Tripa

Jan 13, 2014

Indonesia: heavy fine for palm oil company for slash-and-burn

A court in the Aceh province in northern Sumatra sent a strong signal against the slashing and burning of rainforests: the palm oil company PT Kallista Alam has been sentenced to pay a fine of approximately 9 million US dollars as well as 21 million US dollars for reforestation of Tripa's destroyed swamp forest.

“This ruling sends out a clear message to all companies that think they can destroy protected forest and get away with it,” Muhammad Nur, head of the environmental organization WALHI Aceh, the Indonesian branch of Friends of the Earth, said.

Following pressure from national and international environmentalists, the Indonesian Ministry of the Environment had filed a lawsuit in 2012 against the palm oil company PT Kallista Alam, which led to the ruling and the historically high penalty for illegal slash and burn in the protected Tripa forest. As part of the Leuser Ecosystem, the precious swamp forests are a national strategic zone for environmental protection, as well as a vital habitat of the remaining endangered Sumatran orangutans.

In spring of 2012, Rainforest Rescue took part in the campaign against the palm oil company PT Kallista Alam with 50,000 protest e-mails and 10,000 euros in donations.

The illegal activities of PT Kallista Alam were brought to the attention of the public as early as August 2011, when the then Governor of Aceh gave his approval to the company's 1,605-hectare palm oil plantation – in the middle of the legally protected Leuser Ecosystem.

At the instigation of WALHI, the court of justice in Medan ordered the now newly elected Governor of Aceh to withdraw the concession in August 2012.

In addition to the heavy fine and the compensation payment for the destroyed swamp forest of Tripa, the judges of the District Court of Meulaboh ordered PT Kallista Alam to return 5,769 hectares of land.

This is a great success for the rainforest and its inhabitants. With the help of your 50,000 signatures and 10,000 euros in donations, Rainforest Rescue was able to do its part in helping to win the crucial trial against the palm oil company.

You can also sign our current petition here:
https://www.rainforest-rescue.org/mailalert/936/indonesia-terror-and-eviction-for-palm-oil

For more information:
EN: http://news.xin.msn.com/en/regional/indonesia/indonesian-palm-oil-firm-to-pay-losses-in-historic-ruling-1
EN: http://www.sumatranorangutan.org/pr-tripa-090114.html
EN: http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/news/aceh-court-orders-palm-oil-firm-to-pay-for-environmental-damage/
FR: http://www.7sur7.be/7s7/fr/2765/Environnement/article/detail/1771002/2014/01/09/Historique-une-societe-d-huile-de-palme-condamnee-pour-deboisement.dhtml

A orangutan youngster sitting in a treeHope for the orangutans of Tripa

May 25, 2012

Tripa: Orangutan forest is spared of palm oil plantation

Thanks to international pressure on the Indonesian government, the concession of the palm oil company PT Kallista Alam has been revoked. The area has once again been declared part of an official nature reserve. Rainforest Rescue collected 45,239 signatures and presented them to Indonesian authorities. But the struggle for the orangutans in Tripa continues

Thanks to international pressure on the Indonesian government, the concession of the palm oil company PT Kallista Alam has been revoked. The area has once again been declared part of an official nature reserve. Rainforest Rescue collected 45,239 signatures and presented them to Indonesian authorities. PT Kallista Alam had started fires in the highly sensitive ecosystem in Aceh’s Nagan Raya district. Local conservationists estimate that about 100 orangutans were killed by the fires. 

Government official Mas Achmad Santosa announced earlier this week that all PT Kallista Alam activities in Tripa have been halted, and that the company is under investigation for numerous violations. These include unlawful slash-and-burn clearing, establishing illegal plantations, and offenses against Indonesia’s conservation laws. 

The public prosecutor’s office will also be taking action against corrupt politicians and government agencies that issued the company permits for the plantation in Tripa, Santosa added. 

The original protected status of this area in Tripa has thus effectively been restored: On a map dated May 2011, the peat bogs were part of the Leuser Ecosystem, and thus protected against deforestation for palm oil plantations. In November 2011, however, the palm oil lobby succeeded in having the map changed, removing Tripa from the protected Leuser wilderness. PT Kallista Alam was then granted permission for its plantation.

Stopping this palm oil plantation in Tripa is a major success for environmental protection and animal welfare. The forest is especially rich in rare animal and plant species. Of the remaining 6,500 Sumatran orangutans, Tripa is home to one of the densest populations, feeding on the diversity of lush fruit trees. 

However, PT Kallista Alam is not the only palm oil company that is endangering their habitat. A great number of concessions besiege the 60'000 hectares of deep peat swamps in Tripa. 80 percent of the forest is impaired or has already been destroyed. This is why we support local conservationists, in order to protect the habitat of the highly endangered Sumatra orangutans permanently. 

Please support our Tripa project.

A orangutan yougster sitting in a treeThe survival of the orangutans depends on law enforcement

Apr 18, 2012

Ray of hope for orangutans – official investigations start in Tripa

It is a case of deliberate and systematic violation of indonesian law: the land clearance through forest fires set by oil palm corporation PT Kallista Alam infringes the billion-dollar-deal with Norway as well as national laws, inflicting damage on one of the last orangutan refuges. Now Indonesia's Environment Ministry is pushing investigations leading to what might become a breakthrough for forest conservation.

It is a case of deliberate and systematic violation of indonesian law: the land clearance through forest fires set by oil palm corporation PT Kallista Alam infringes several national laws as well as the billion-dollar-deal with Norway, the climate agency in charge reports. A strict two-year-suspension on forest cleareance should have been the basis for the money transfer. 

The climate agency is now urging the Ministry of Environment and the Head of Police to conduct further investigations and to take appropriate action "to bring a halt to these activities and to penalize and recover the loss caused by the ecosystem degradation".

According to investigations, PT Kallista Alam has broken at least three national laws concerning plantation, Living Environment Protection and Management and  Spatial Planning.

International pressure is showing results

Along with other environmentalists, Rainforest Rescue made the oil palm company's crimes public two weeks ago and gathered more than 40,000 signatures asking President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono and the competent courts to enforce the existing environmental laws. Now, finally, theoretical justice could be put into practice in Indonesia. 

This development is a ray of hope for the unique ecosystem on Sumatra and for its critically endangered inhabitants. Furthermore, indonesian law enforcement would result in an important reduction of global climate gases. 

Sign the petition and read more about the Tripa peat swamp forest.

 

a orangutan babyThese orangutans need our protection

Apr 4, 2012

Aceh judges refuse to rule over Tripa Case

In the case of the deforestation of the protected Tripa peat swamps, the indonesian court announced on Tuesday, 3rd of April, that it was unable to rule as the parties involved should have attempted mediation first. The conservationists who brought the case to court fear for the fate of the orangutans and have announced to appeal to the High Court.

In the case of the deforestation of the protected Tripa peat swamps, the Indonesian court announced on Tuesday, 3rd of April, that it was unable to rule as the parties involved should have attempted mediation first. The conservationists who brought the case to court fear for the fate of the orangutans and have announced to appeal to the High Court.

The plaintiffs, local environmentalists, were far from convinced by the court's arguments: "I suspect the judge was feeling caught in the middle between heavy political pressure in Aceh and the massive campaign overseas, and effectively did a 'Pontius Pilate' and just washed his hands of the case", landscape protection specialist Graham Usher says. “If this legal challenge had no legal basis, then why wasn’t it rejected at the beginning?” fumed T. Muhammad Zulfikar, Director of the environmental oragnization WALHI.  “There is no doubt we will be appealing this appalling decision."

Public protest is now more important than ever   

WALHI is now moving on to the High Court. Cause for complaint was the official concession the oil palm corporation PT Kallista Alam received from the governor of Aceh. This allows the company to cut-and-burn the precious forest and thus to threaten one of the last habitats of the endangered orangutans. Public outrage is now more important than ever, to ensure that Indonesia's environmental laws finally are enforced, WALHI pointed out. So far more than 30,000 people from all over the world have protested and signed a petition.

The deforestation is a blatant contradiction of Indonesia's proclaimed climate protection goals. In fact, the emission of climate gases was supposed to be reduced by 26 percent. The one billion dollar package Norway had promised to Indonesia in return for climate protection, might be put into question.

While the jurisprudence has chosen a very leisurely pace, huge man made fires have blazed across Tripa in the last days. This area has long been recognized as a UNEP/UNESCO Great Ape Survival Partnership Priority Site for Great Ape Conservation. If the deforestation in favour of oil palm plantations is not stopped, the critically endangered Sumatra orangutans might disappear forever by the end of 2012. 

Take action now.